The Strangled Corpse by KYŪSAKU YUMENO

Introduction and translated from the Japanese by Sacha Idell

Kyūsaku Yumeno (1889–1936) was the pen name of the Japanese writer Taidō Sugiyama. Celebrated in Japan as one of the country’s first avant-garde writers, Yumeno is notorious for his invocations of Occidental imagery, as well as his penchant for unusual, often downright bizarre, detective stories. His magnum opus, the experimental mystery novel Dogura Magura, was adapted to film in the 1980s. He died suddenly, leaving several works unfinished, in 1936.

I am on a bench in a park, somewhere, and before my eyes the stream of a fountain rises and falls, falls and rises in the twilight. As I listen to its sound, I spread and unfold the evening paper. And, looking through the paper for the same story as always, I roll a Golden Bat cigarette and laugh.

The article I’ve been searching for is related to the poor young girl from the suburbs, the one I strangled in an abandoned house nearly a month prior.
Once, I felt that she and I were profoundly in love, but one evening, when we arranged to meet, the sight of her, with her furisode kimono and almost peach-like hairstyle, so in fashion right now—it was all just too much, too beautiful for me; I couldn’t breathe, I couldn’t bear it, and so I brought her to the suburbs, by the x x train crossing, to a solitary, detached building. And when I killed her, still surprised and unsuspecting, I must admit that I felt a profound sense of unburdening. It was as though I had become a madman for only an instant. Or so I can’t help but think.

Afterward, I took the waistband of her clothing, and, attaching it to the top of a sliding door, arranged the scene to look as though she had committed suicide by hanging. And, ever since then, when I returned to my boarding house determined to survive, I’ve come to this park twice each day, and bought the newspaper, the morning and evening edition, and sat at this bench to read. It’s become my only habit.

I’ve been expecting an explosive headline: FURISODE GIRL’S HANGING SUICIDE! Or something along those lines.

And so I check and check again, the pure blue of the sky above that abandoned house hovering over me, laughing derisively, as the newspapers consume my routine.

Even now, my world revolves around them. I fold up the newspaper, roll another Bat, and beneath this gray, clouded sky, I head in the direction of home. Trapped in the same feelings as always, I strike a match, and by chance I see a page from a newspaper on the ground. An article takes my breath away.

It is unmistakably the same evening paper, with the same date as today, but someone else must have abandoned it on this bench. And yet, in the center of the page is an article I hadn’t noticed, a big scoop that draws my eyes with electric magnetism.

STRANGLED CORPSE IN AN EMPTY HOUSE

At a deserted house in the neighborhood by x x train crossing, a half-month-old skeleton has been found! The body is a young man in a business suit!

I seize the article and, as if in a daze, fly from the park. Before long, without knowing how I arrived, I find myself in the neighborhood by x x train crossing, overcome with confusion as I stand before a particularly memorable abandoned house.

I realize I’m clutching the newspaper in one hand, and stare at the headline, and then at the house. Carefully looking up and down the street to make certain no one is watching, I open the front door and step inside.
Within the empty house it is almost completely dark. Inside the eight-mat tatami room where the young girl’s body hangs I walk to the center and strike a match . . .

“. . .”

. . .and before me is a corpse that is unmistakably my own.

The body is hung with the band of a furisode, a Bat in its mouth, newspaper in its right hand, and match in its left.

The shock is too much. The rest of my energy has left me and gone somewhere far from here. As the ember falls from my match and tumbles toward the floor. . .this must be some scheme, a trick concocted by the police. . .my mind continues to race until I hear the laughter of a young woman come from the darkness behind me.

There was no discrepancy between it and the voice of the young woman I strangled.

“O ho ho ho ho. . .I see you’ve come to understand how I felt.”

夢野久作
縊死体
こかの公園のベンチである。
 眼の前には一条の噴水が、夕暮の青空高く高くあがっては落ち、あがっては落ちしている。
 その噴水の音を聞きながら、私は二三枚の夕刊を拡げ散らしている。そうして、どの新聞を見ても、私が探している記事が見当らないことがわかると、私はニッタリと冷笑しながら、ゴシャゴシャに重ねて押し丸めた。
 私が探している記事というのは今から一箇月ばかり前、郊外の或る空家の中で、私に絞め殺された可哀相な下町娘の死体に関する報道であった。
 私は、その娘と深い恋仲になっていたものであるが、或る夕方のこと、その娘が私に会いに来た時の桃割れと振袖姿が、あんまり美し過ぎたので、私は息苦しさに堪えられなくなって、彼女を郊外の××踏切り附近の離れ家に連れ込んだ。そうして驚き怪しんでいる娘を、イキナリ一思いに絞め殺して、やっと重荷を卸(おろ)したような気持ちになったものである。万一こうでもしなかったら、俺はキチガイになったかも知れないぞ……と思いながら……。
 それから私は、その娘の扱帯(しごき)を解いて、部屋の鴨居(かもい)に引っかけて、縊死を遂げたように装わせておいた。そうして何喰わぬ顔をして下宿に帰ったものであるが、それ以来私は、毎日毎日、朝と晩と二度ずつ、おきまりのようにこの公園に来て、このベンチに腰をかけて、入口で買って来た二三枚の朝刊や夕刊に眼を通すのが、一つの習慣になってしまった。
「振袖娘の縊死」
 といったような標題を予期しながら……。そうして、そんな記事がどこにも発見されない事をたしかめると、その空家の上空に当る青い青い大気の色を見上げながら、ニヤリと一つ冷笑をするのが、やはり一つの習慣のようになってしまったのであった。
 今もそうであった。私は二三枚の新聞紙をゴシャゴシャに丸めて、ベンチの下へ投げ込むと、バットを一本口に啣(くわ)えながら、その方向

の曇った空を振り返った。そうして例の通りの冷笑を含みながらマッチを擦(す)ろうとしたが、その時にフト足下に落ちている一枚の新聞紙が眼に付くと、私はハッとして息を詰めた。
 それはやはり同じ日付けの夕刊の社会面であったが、誰かこのベンチに腰をかけた人が棄てて行ったものらしい。そのまん中の処に掲(だ)してある特種らしい三段抜きの大きな記事が、私の眼に電気のように飛び付いて来た。
空家の怪死体
     ××踏切附近の廃屋の中で
     死後約一個月を経た半骸骨
  会社員らしい若い背広男
 私はこの新聞記事を掴むと、夢中で公園を飛び出した。そうしてどこをどうして来たものか、××踏切り附近の思い出深い廃家の前に来て、茫然と突っ立っていた。
 私はやがて、片手に掴んだままの新聞紙に気が付くと、慌てて前後を見まわした。そうして誰も通っていないのを見澄ますと、思い切って表の扉(と)を開いて中に這入(はい)った。
 空家の中は殆んど真暗であった。その中を探り探り娘の死体を吊るしておいた奥の八畳の間(ま)へ来て、マッチを擦って見ると……。
「……………」
 ……それは紛(まご)う方ない私の死体であった。
 バンドを梁(はり)に引っかけて、バットを啣えて、右手にマッチを、左手に新聞紙を掴んで……。
 私は驚きの余り気が遠くなって来た。マッチの燃えさしを取り落しながら……これは警察当局のトリックじゃないか……といったような疑いをチラリと頭の片隅に浮かめかけたようであったが、その瞬間に、思いもかけない私の背後(うしろ)のクラ暗(やみ)の中から、若い女の笑い声が聞えて来た。
 それは私が絞め殺した彼女の声に相違なかった。
「オホホホホホホ……あたしの思いが、おわかりになって……」